just


just
I [[t]ʤʌ̱st[/t]] ADVERB USES
(Please look at category 25 to see if the expression you are looking for is shown under another headword.)
1) ADV: ADV before v You use just to say that something happened a very short time ago, or is starting to happen at the present time. For example, if you say that someone has just arrived, you mean that they arrived a very short time ago.

I've just bought a new house...

The two had only just met...

I just had the most awful dream...

I'm only just beginning to take it in that he's still missing.

2) ADV: ADV before v, ADV about/going to-inf If you say that you are just doing something, you mean that you are doing it now and will finish it very soon. If you say that you are just about to do something, or just going to do it, you mean that you will do it very soon.

I'm just making the sauce for the cauliflower...

I'm just going to walk down the lane now and post some letters...

The Vietnam War was just about to end.

3) ADV: ADV adv/prep, ADV as/when cl (emphasis) You can use just to emphasize that something is happening at exactly the moment of speaking or at exactly the moment that you are talking about.

Randall would just now be getting the Sunday paper...

Just then the phone rang...

I remember now. He arrived just at the moment it happened...

Just as she prepared to set off to the next village, two friends arrived in a taxi.

4) ADV: ADV group/cl (emphasis) You use just to indicate that something is no more important, interesting, or difficult, for example, than you say it is, especially when you want to correct a wrong idea that someone may get or has already got.

It's just a suggestion...

It's not just a financial matter...

You can tell just by looking at me that I am all right...

The reason women are drinking is just because they like it.

Syn:
only, simply
5) ADV: ADV n (emphasis) You use just to emphasize that you are talking about a small part, not the whole of an amount.

That's just one example of the kind of experiments you can do...

These are just a few of the many options available.

Syn:
only, merely
6) ADV: ADV amount (emphasis) You use just to emphasize how small an amount is or how short a length of time is.

Stephanie and David redecorated a room in just three days...

Remember he's just fourteen years old.

Syn:
7) ADV: ADV before v You can use just in front of a verb to indicate that the result of something is unfortunate or undesirable and is likely to make the situation worse rather than better.

Leaving like I did just made it worse...

They just hurt the people in their community, they didn't really solve any problem.

Syn:
8) ADV: ADV adj/adv/prep, ADV before v You use just to indicate that what you are saying is the case, but only by a very small degree or amount.

Her hand was just visible by the light from the sitting room...

It was Colin's voice, only just audible...

I arrived just in time for my flight to London...

Jack took out his notes and talked for just under an hour...

He could just reach the man's head with his right hand.

Syn:
9) ADV: ADV with modal You use just with `might,' `may,' and `could', when you mean that there is a small chance of something happening, even though it is not very likely.

It's an old trick but it just might work...

It may just be possible.

10) ADV: ADV before v, ADV adj/n (emphasis) You use just to emphasize the following word or phrase, in order to express feelings such as annoyance, admiration, or certainty.

She just won't relax...

I knew you'd be here. I just knew...

Isn't it fantastic? Just look at that!...

Just think, we should be home this time tomorrow...

I don't see the point in it really. It's just stupid...

Isn't he just the most beautiful thing you ever saw?

Syn:
11) ADV: ADV before v You use just with instructions, polite requests, or statements of intention, to make your request or statement seem less difficult. [SPOKEN]

Could you just give us a description of your cat?...

Can you just lift the table for a second?...

I'm just going to ask you a bit more about your father's business...

Just add water, milk and butter...

I'd just like to mention that, personally, I don't think it's wise...

Just wait for me in the lounge.

12) ADV: ADV n You use just in expressions such as just a minute and just a moment to ask someone to wait for a short time. [SPOKEN]

`Let me in, Di.' - `Okay. Just a minute.'

Syn:
13) ADV: ADV n You can use just in expressions such as just a minute and just a moment to interrupt someone, for example in order to disagree with them, explain something, or calm them down. [SPOKEN]

Well, now just a second, I don't altogether agree with the premise.

14) ADV: with neg, cl ADV (emphasis) You can use just with negative question tags, for example `isn't he just?' and `don't they just!', to say that you agree completely with what has been said. [BRIT, SPOKEN]

`That's crazy,' I said. `Isn't it just?' he said...

`The manager's going to have some tough decisions to make.' - `Won't he just.'

15) ADV: ADV before v If you say that you can just see or hear something, you mean that it is easy for you to imagine seeing or hearing it.

I can just see the nasty suspicious looks I'd be getting from you if we started whispering together...

I can just hear her telling her friends, `Well, I blame his mother!'

Syn:
16) ADV: ADV cl/prep/adv You use just to mean exactly, when you are specifying something precisely or asking for precise information.

It is really not clear just why he became a Socialist...

There are no statistics about just how many people won't vote...

My arm hurts too, just here...

That's Warwick Road, just opposite Earls Court tube station.

Syn:
17) ADV: ADV n (emphasis) You use just to emphasize that a particular thing is exactly what is needed or fits a particular description exactly.

Kiwi fruit are just the thing for a healthy snack...

`Let's get a coffee somewhere.' - `I know just the place.'

...the bottle of whiskey that we had stashed behind the bookcase for just this eventuality.

Syn:
18) ADV: ADV like n, ADV as adj/adv, ADV n (emphasis) You use just in expressions such as just like, just as...as, and just the same when you are emphasizing the similarity between two things or two people.

Behind the facade they are just like the rest of us...

He worked just as hard as anyone...

At 62 years old, her voice sounded just the same as it did when she was 21.

19) PHRASE: PHR n/adj/adv You use just about to indicate that what you are talking about is so close to being the case that it can be regarded as being the case.

There are those who believe that Nick Price is just about the best golfer in the world...

What does she read? Just about everything...

`His memory must be completely back, then?' - `Just about.'

Syn:
20) PHRASE: PHR before v, PHR n/adj You use just about to indicate that what you are talking about is in fact the case, but only by a very small degree or amount.

I can just about tolerate it at the moment...

We've got just about enough time to get there.

Syn:
only just
21) PHRASE: PHR amount Just on is used in mentioning an almost exact number or amount. [BRIT]

Eve, squinting at the clock, saw it was just on 7 a.m...

Many were retired people, and just on a fifth were in their fifties.

22) CONVENTION Just so is used to agree with or confirm a statement that has been made. [BRIT, OLD-FASHIONED, SPOKEN]

`She has a large flat in Mayfair.' - `Just so.'

Syn:
quite, exactly
23) PHRASE: usu v-link PHR If things are just so, they are done or arranged exactly as they should be or exactly as someone wants them.

I do her hair, and it has to be just so.

24) PHRASE: PHR cl You use the expression it's just that when you are making a complaint, suggestion, or excuse, so that the person you are talking to will not get annoyed with you.

I'm sorry I struck you. I didn't mean to. It's just that I was so mad...

Your hair is all right; it's just that you need a haircut.

25) just my lucksee luck
not justsee not
just nowsee now
only justsee only
it just goes to showsee show
II [[t]ʤʌ̱st[/t]] ADJECTIVE USE
1) ADJ-GRADED If you describe a situation, action, or idea as just, you mean that it is right or acceptable according to particular moral principles, such as respect for all human beings. [FORMAL]

In a just society there must be a system whereby people can seek redress through the courts...

She fought honestly for a just cause and for freedom...

Was Pollard's life sentence just or was it too severe?

Syn:
Ant:
Derived words:
justly ADV-GRADED ADV with v

They were not treated justly in the past...

No government can justly claim authority unless it is based on the will of the people.

2) to get your just desertssee desert

English dictionary. 2008.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • just — just …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • Just — ist ein seltener männlicher Vorname, Kurzform von Justus (Vorname) Just Scheu (1903–1956), deutscher Komponist, Filmschauspieler und Rundfunksprecher Just ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Adolf Just (1859–1936), deutscher Naturheilkundler …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • just — adj [Latin justus lawful, merited, from jus right, law]: conforming to law or to the underlying principles of law: as a: conforming to reason or a standard of correctness just sanctions cannot be excessive in relation to the offense b: conforming …   Law dictionary

  • just — just1 [just] adj. [ME < OFr juste < L justus, lawful, rightful, proper < jus, right, law: see JURY1] 1. right or fair; equitable; impartial [a just decision] 2. righteous; upright [a just man] 3. deserved; merited [just praise] …   English World dictionary

  • Just — Just, a. [F. juste, L. justus, fr. jus right, law, justice; orig., that which is fitting; akin to Skr. yu to join. Cf. {Injury}, {Judge}, {Jury}, {Giusto}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Conforming or conformable to rectitude or justice; not doing wrong to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • just — adverb. 1. When it means ‘a little time ago’, just is used differently in BrE and AmE. In BrE the usual construction is with a perfect tense formed with have: I have just arrived home, but in AmE the verb is normally a simple past form: I just… …   Modern English usage

  • Just — Just, adv. 1. Precisely; exactly; in place, time, or degree; neither more nor less than is stated. [1913 Webster] And having just enough, not covet more. Dryden. [1913 Webster] The god Pan guided my hand just to the heart of the beast. Sir P.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Just — * Just, ein Nebenwort, welches nur im gemeinen Leben, besonders Niedersachsens, üblich ist. 1) Genau, eben, gerecht, der Sache und dem Raume nach. Es ist just voll. Es ist just recht. Der Stöpsel passet just hinein. Das will just so viel sagen,… …   Grammatisch-kritisches Wörterbuch der Hochdeutschen Mundart

  • just — JUST, Ă, juşti, ste, adj. (Adesea adverbial) 1. Conform cu adevărul sau cu echitatea; drept, adevărat, echitabil. ♢ (Despre oameni) Care acţionează şi judecă în conformitate cu dreptatea. ♢ Fundat, legitim, legal. 2. Potrivit2, corespunzător. –… …   Dicționar Român

  • Just Be — Álbum de estudio de DJ Tiësto Publicación 6 de abril, 2004 …   Wikipedia Español

  • Just — may refer to: *Justice * Just (song), a single by Radiohead from the 1995 album The Bends *Jordan University of Science and Technology *Just Music, a record label *Hazel Just, a writer *Just (band), a three piece grunge band from Ireland *Paul… …   Wikipedia


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